1969 VC-11A Executive Transport Entered Service. The first Turbojet Aircraft in Coast Guard Service

VC 11AThe Coast Guard acquired a single Grumman Gulfstream II in February 1969 as a high speed executive transport for use by the Commandant and the Secretary of Transportation. A turbo-jet, purchased off-the-shelf, it was equipped with an Inertial Navigation System that allowed it to go any place in the world without outside input.  It was based out of Washington National Airport. 

The Gulfstream II, design number G1159 was the successor to the highly successful G-159 Gulfstream I [VC-4A]. The G1159 design retained much of the G-159 fuselage and was also fitted with dual nose and main-wheels. New wings with 25 degrees of sweep and swept T-tail were designed.

The VC-4A was retained. A USCG Headquarters Memo, dated 20 December 1973, addresses the use of the VC-4A  and the VC-11A.

“These aircraft are used to provide air transportation on a demand basis, to the Secretary [of Transportation] and members of his staff, the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard and members of his staff and such other personnel as may be authorized by the Commandant.  The VC-4A is normally used for all flights east of the Mississippi and the VC-11A is normally used only for flights west of the Mississippi or outside CONUS.”

The VC-4A flew for an average of 800 hours per year and carried an average of 7.8 passengers per flight.  The VC-11A, on the other hand, flew an average of 600 hours per year and carried an average of 6.5 passengers per flight.

Manufacturer Grumman
Designation VC-11A
Wingspan 68 ft 10 in
Length 79 ft 11 in
Height 71 ft 4 in
Engines 2 Rolls-Royce “Spey” Mk.511-8 turbofans
50.7 kn of thrust each
Gross weight 59,500 lbs
Fuel Capacity 3,450 gallons
Max. speed 947 km/h / 588 mph
Sea level climb 5,050 feet per minute
Service ceiling 43,000 ft
Range 2,930 Nautical miles
Crew 4
CG Tail number USCG 01
Payload 12 passengers